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Sixty percent of UK workers overworked

A staggering 60 percent of the UK working population feel we work too many hours, a poll by Monster.co.uk can reveal. Almost two thirds of UK workers work over 40 hour weeks, with 34 percent working more than 50 hours each week. Both groups feel they work too long. 22 percent of workers stated that they were happy to work overtime in order to further their careers, but only a dismal 18 percent works a 35 hour week or less

A staggering 60 percent of the UK working population feel we work too many hours, a poll by Monster.co.uk can reveal. Almost two thirds of UK workers work over 40 hour weeks, with 34 percent working more than 50 hours each week. Both groups feel they work too long. 22 percent of workers stated that they were happy to work overtime in order to further their careers, but only a dismal 18 percent works a 35 hour week or less.


Monster.co.uk recently asked 2,201 workers throughout the UK, “Do you think you work too many hours?” The main findings are as follows:



  • 34% Yes, I work more than 50 hours per week

  • 26% Yes, I work more than 40 hours per week

  • 12% No, I work part time/9-5

  • 22% I’m ambitious and am happy to work overtime

  • 6% I do adhoc hours but never more than 35 hours per week


Continuous overtime can be caused by a number of factors. Occasionally, company culture dictates that employees stay in the office beyond their contracted hours. However, poor workload management and reluctance to refuse extra work can have an equally detrimental effect on work life balance.


It’s often hard to say no, but consistently saying yes can actually sabotage our careers. Monster.co.uk recommends the following tips to manage workload and avoid taking on too much extra work:



  • Avoid confronting your manager on your workload as a whole. Instead, limit negotiation to a specific project

  • If you are unable to help with a task, avoid a blunt refusal. Instead, explain calmly and politely why you are unable to assist this time

  • If you need to say no, try to avoid falling into the trap of being over apologetic. Say what you need to in a concise way so that it doesn't sound like you are trying to make excuses to avoid taking on the extra work

  • Stand your ground. If people get the impression that they can talk you round then they may persist until you give in

  • For more advice on how to say no, check out the full article on Monster.co.uk


For expert advice on all aspects of enhancing your career, please visit http://career-advice.monster.co.uk/in-the-workplace/careers.aspx