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Half of employees can’t recite their organisation’s vision or values

More than half (52%) of employees in the UK can’t recite their organisation’s vision, and nearly half (49%) can’t recite their organisation’s values, according to new research from workplace help platform, Rungway.

  • One in five (18%) don’t think the values and vision reflect the company’s reality
  • Men are more likely than women to want to contribute to the company vision and values
  • IT services workers want the most involvement among sectors

More than half (52%) of employees in the UK can’t recite their organisation’s vision, and nearly half (49%) can’t recite their organisation’s values, according to new research from workplace help platform, Rungway.

Two in five (39%) also said they wish they had more involvement in contributing to their company’s vision and values.

In terms of the language used, more than a quarter (27%) feel their organisation’s vision or values have too much corporate jargon and almost one in five (18%) say they don’t reflect what the company is actually like.

Young workers critical on corporate jargon

Among demographics, men (45%) are more likely than women (32%) to want to be involved in contributing to the company’s vision or values than women, and those aged 25 to 34-years-old are the most likely to be able to recite their company’s vision and values (both 64%). That said, they are also the most likely (31%) among age groups to say the vision and values have too much corporate jargon.

Older workers least likely to engage with vision and values

The research also suggested poor knowledge of vision and values among older employees. Those aged between 45 and 54-years-old and those aged 55 to 64-years-old were the least likely among age groups to be able to recite their company’s vision (both 63%).

IT services workers are keen to be involved

Among surveyed sectors, those working in IT services were the most likely to be able to recite their company’s vision (59%) while banking workers (63%) were the best at reciting company values.

On the flip side, healthcare workers (60%) were the least likely to be able to recite the company vision, and property workers (57%) were the least likely to be able to recite the company vision. 

IT services workers (39%) were also the most likely to say their company’s vision and values are too corporate-jargon heavy, however they are also the sector that most want to be involved in contributing to vision and values (74%).

Meanwhile, 30% of marketing workers are the most likely to feel that their company’s vision and values don’t reflect what the company is actually like – the highest proportion among sectors.

“Company visions and values need to represent an organisation's purpose and inspire employees to contribute to that mission, so it’s worrying that so many employees don't know what these are. The research also shows more workers want to be more involved in contributing to vision and values, so companies need to work harder to engage their people in the process and think creatively to encourage everyone to find their voice. Boards are really focusing on employer branding, and in the fight for talent, companies must collaborate with their people to create compelling narratives that motivate the talent they have to stay on-side. Unengaged employees will walk away if nothing changes,” said Julie Chakraverty, founder of Rungway.

Rungway surveyed 2,000 Brits in employment on their feelings and attitudes to their workplace. For more information on Rungway, please visit www.rungway.com